top of page

Fitness Group

Public·51 members
Matthew Ross
Matthew Ross

Anyone Fancy A Transparent Flexible Tablet


In 2004, a team led by Prof. Roel Vertegaal at Queen's University's Human Media Lab in Canada developed PaperWindows,[21] the first prototype bendable paper computer and first Organic User Interface. Since full-colour, US Letter-sized displays were not available at the time, PaperWindows deployed a form of active projection mapping of computer windows on real paper documents that worked together as one computer through 3D tracking. At a lecture to the Gyricon and Human-Computer Interaction teams at Xerox PARC on 4 May 2007, Prof. Vertegaal publicly introduced the term Organic User Interface (OUI) as a means of describing the implications of non-flat display technologies on user interfaces of the future: paper computers, flexible form factors for computing devices, but also encompassing rigid display objects of any shape, with wrap-around, skin-like displays. The lecture was published a year later as part of a special issue on Organic User Interfaces[22] in the Communications of the ACM. In May 2010, the Human Media Lab partnered with ASU's Flexible Display Center to produce PaperPhone,[23] the first flexible smartphone with a flexible electrophoretic display. PaperPhone used bend gestures for navigating contents. Since then, the Human Media Lab has partnered with Plastic Logic and Intel to introduce the first flexible tablet PC and multi-display e-paper computer, PaperTab,[24] at CES 2013, debuting the world's first actuated flexible smartphone prototype, MorePhone[25] in April 2013.




Anyone fancy a transparent flexible tablet


DOWNLOAD: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftweeat.com%2F2tUE48&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1Lqq8o4tFFzmuP9HBcxLzA



In May 2011, Human Media Lab at Queen's University in Canada introduced PaperPhone, the first flexible smartphone, in partnership with the Arizona State University Flexible Display Center.[23] PaperPhone used 5 bend sensors to implement navigation of the user interface through bend gestures of corners and sides of the display. In January 2013, the Human Media Lab introduced the first flexible tablet PC, PaperTab,[24] in collaboration with Plastic Logic and Intel Labs, at CES. PaperTab is a multi-display environment in which each display represents a window, app or computer document. Displays are tracked in 3D to allow multidisplay operations, such as collate to enlarge the display space, or pointing with one display onto another to pull open a document file. In April 2013 in Paris, the Human Media Lab, in collaboration with Plastic Logic, unveiled the world's first actuated flexible smartphone prototype, MorePhone.[25] MorePhone actuates its body to notify users upon receiving a phone call or message.


A new transparent, flexible touchpad can sense the touch of a finger even when the material is stretched or bent, which could help engineers one day create advanced wearable touch screens, according to a new study.


Now researchers have developed a new, flexible touchpad that can tell the difference between a touch and a stretch. Moreover, the device is also transparent, which suggests that it could get combined with a flexible display to create a flexible touch screen.


"This is the first time anyone has made a transparent, touch-sensitive electronic device that can detect touch while the device is being bent or stretched," said study senior author John Madden, an electrical engineer at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.


OLED displays are not just thin and efficient - they provide the best image quality ever and they can also be made transparent, flexible, foldable and even rollable and stretchable in the future. OLEDs represent the future of display technology!


OLEDs are used today in mobile phones, digital cameras, VR headsets, tablets, laptops and TVs. In 2021, over 500 million AMOLED screens will be produced - mostly to satisfy demand from smartphones, wearables, tablets, laptops and TVs. The leading AMOLED producer is Samsung Display, and most premium phones today adopt either rigid or flexible OLED displays - including those from Apple, Samsung, Huawei, Oppo, Motorola, Sony and others.


OLEDs can be used to create excellent light source. OLEDs offer diffuse area lighting and can be flexible, efficient, light, thin, transparent, color-tunable and more. OLEDs enable new designs and these devices emit healthier light compared to CFLs and LED lighting devices.


I call it Oogoo II. It is a DIY conductive silicone rubber that can be used to create a transparent stylus for iPod, iPhone, iPad, and other capacitive screen smart phones. Because the contact part of the stylus is transparent, you can see your lines and draw more precisely than with a regular stylus. This instructable shows how to make conductive rubber and use it to create three types of stylus: 1 Hack any pen or pencil and turn it into a standard type stylus for pressing keys or drawing sketches while still allowing it to write on paper. 2 Use conductive rubber as a flexible glue to make a transparent flexible round tip stylus for precision use in drawing and key pressing. 3 Use conductive rubber to make a flat transparent paint brush tip stylus for use in drawing and paint programs. It fits in a wallet The intro pic shows the paint brush style drawing a line on an iPod. 350c69d7ab


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

  • Alexandra Rose
  • Dolores Lope
    Dolores Lope
  • Sagar Sharma
    Sagar Sharma
  • Master Distributors Inc.
    Master Distributors Inc.
  • Wellness SEO
    Wellness SEO
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page